Dec 09 2009

Lesson Plan: Visualizing Economic Growth and Economic Development

Published by at 3:39 pm under Development,Lesson Plan

Essential Question: How does economic development differ from economic growth?

Objective: Whereas most assignments deal in information and analysis, this one deals in imagination. Here we ask you to portray what you believe more economically developed countries look like. And considering that development is a relative term, we also want to see how a country could end up if it only achieves economic growth, without any progress on development.

Goal: To visualize and depict the distinction between economic development and economic growth.

Process:

  • Class is divided into pairs, each pair is either an “A” or a “B” pair. A groups will focus on Economic Growth and group B groups on Economic Development
  • Read chapter 30 of the Course Companion with special attention to your assigned section.
  • A groups will focus on pages 321-325 on “Economic Growth” and “Consequences of Economic Growth”
  • B groups will focus on pages 325-328 “Sources of Economic Development”
  • Using PhotoStory, create a slideshow depicting the situation you were assigned (either “growth” or “development”). For an example of a PhotoStory, quickly watch this one on the Dust Bowl. Here is a tutorial from Microsoft on how to quickly start making your slideshow in PhotoStory.
  • Save images to a folder on your computer, then import them into a PhotoStory when you are ready to start creating your slideshow.
  • Add subtitles and/0r your own narration to your PhotoStory. If you wish, you can add music to your PhotoStory as well.
  • Be sure to include at least ten images in your slideshow.

As you and your partner gather images online, keep in mind the definitions of growth and development. Images should portray these definitions in a creative way.

When your PhotoStory is complete, save the file “for playback on your computer”, then submit the finished file into your class’s folder on Classworks. Each pair will have the chance to show their slideshow to the class. The two best slideshows from the class (one on growth and one on development) will be posted to this blog for the world to see!
This lesson was originally created by Sean Maley, IB Economics teacher at the International School of Bucharest, Romania.

About the author:  Jason Welker teaches International Baccalaureate and Advanced Placement Economics at Zurich International School in Switzerland. In addition to publishing various online resources for economics students and teachers, Jason developed the online version of the Economics course for the IB and is has authored two Economics textbooks: Pearson Baccalaureate’s Economics for the IB Diploma and REA’s AP Macroeconomics Crash Course. Jason is a native of the Pacific Northwest of the United States, and is a passionate adventurer, who considers himself a skier / mountain biker who teaches Economics in his free time. He and his wife keep a ski chalet in the mountains of Northern Idaho, which now that they live in the Swiss Alps gets far too little use. Read more posts by this author

5 responses so far

5 Responses to “Lesson Plan: Visualizing Economic Growth and Economic Development”

  1. Russellon 24 Dec 2009 at 1:54 am

    A great idea. I found the group assignment to be confusing to read.

    I'm assuming the group structure is two people per PhotoStory presentation. One member of the group is an "A" (focus is on the Growth part of the text) while the other person is a "B" (focus is on the Development part of the text).

    "A" people read about Growth. "B" people read about Development. (After reading) They share their knowledge and discuss differences.

    The groups each plan their presentation – perhaps create a story board with the kinds of images they would show (if Internet is down, or students lack PhotoStory skills, this might be an acceptable alternative end to this part of the activity.)

    Armed with a plan, a deadline, and a shared vision, the two members search for the images they need.

    In another session, each group sits down to compose their photostory and do the music/voice production.

    10 images are required – no more than five minutes – leave the audience wanting more!

    Each pair presents their final work to the class.

  2. Mitchell_Broughtonon 08 Feb 2012 at 3:14 am

    1.What is human development and what factors contribute to this development?

    Human development is the growth of a person’s choices in life. It is the ability for humans to make choices that impact their lives. The factors that contribute to it are the general health and life expectancy of the people, political freedom and equality, and general knowledge and education.

    2.What does it mean to have an improvement in the standard of living?

    The standard of living is made up of many things. An improvement would mean that equality has increased, as well as education, housing, food quality, and overall quality and choice in goods.

    3.What is the difference between economic growth and development?

    Economic growth spokes mostly to a rise in GDP of a country, while economic development speaks more to the standard of living of its consumers.

    4.What indicators are used to measure the economic development of nations?

    Economic development is measured by health, education, life expectancy, literacy rates, etc…

    5.How can data help us to better understand LDC’s while developing more effective strategies to improve their development?

    Data can help see which are of the economy a LDC is having the most problems with. For example, an LDC may have a very high literacy rate; however, the life expectancy is very short. This might indicate that the country has a good education system, but lacks good health care.

    6.What are obstacles that stand in the way of development?

    A lot of times LDCs are very reliant upon trade of primary goods to developed countries. The prices of primary goods are constantly decreasing, earning the LDCs less money, as well as the fact that a sudden economic crash could cause the demand of primary goods to significantly drop, crippling the LDC’s economy.

  3. Michael Mayeron 01 Mar 2012 at 8:28 pm

    Mitchell,

    You answer the questions well. When you mention literacy rates, life expectancy, etc. as indicators for economic development….. Are you sure those are indicators in and of themselves? It seems to me like those numbers must be analyzed in order to come to a conclusion about the economic development in a country whereas the HDI (human development index) is a more straightforward indicator for economic development.

  4. Michaelon 01 Mar 2012 at 8:26 pm

    What is human development and what factors contribute to this development?
    Human development is the increase in education and living conditions of the citizens of a country. More money spent on education, health, and infrastructure can lead to a country's human development.
    What does it mean to have an improvement in the standard of living?
    It means that the things around a citizen of a country are of a higher caliber than before. Newer roads, lamp posts, buildings are examples of things that can be improved. Also, access to health care must be easy and effective for a high standard of living.
    What is the difference between economic growth and development?
    Growth is more numbers-oriented whereas development measures the actual living conditions of the average citizen. You can have growth, where revenue increases, but no development, if the growth for example came from a decrease in minimum wage that contributes to a worsened living condition for the average citizen.
    What indicators are used to measure the economic development of nations?
    The human development index is used to measure the economic development of nations.
    How can data help us to better understand LDC’s while developing more effective strategies to improve their development.
    Numbers are only numbers, but they can help get a picture of the condition of people in general. If there simply is not enough money going into a certain aspect of a country like health, it is easy to see where the development needs improvement.
    What are obstacles that stand in the way of development?
    The risk of debt in borrowing money to aid development is a huge barrier to economic development. Development comes at a cost that is sometimes insurmountable. That is why foreign aid is sometimes so important to the well-being of a country.

  5. Murray Piano Tuningon 19 Nov 2014 at 2:30 am

    Murray Piano Tuning

    Lesson Plan: Visualizing Economic Growth and Economic Development | Economics in Plain English