Jun 16 2008

Another year of blogging at Welker’s Wikinomics wraps up…

Published by at 10:44 am under Teaching

This blog was started in March of 2007 as a resource for economics students at the Shanghai American School, originally meant to accompany our class wiki. At first, the posts were written specifically for AP and IB Econ students at SAS, but over time readers from all over the world started visiting, reading and commenting on the blog. Other sites linked here, and our numbers steadily increased from rougly 40 visitors per day (mostly students) 12 months ago to an average of 200 visitors per day today. Since June of 2007 the blog has had over 60,000 visitors.

Welker’s Wikinomics Blog has changed in other ways as well. Teachers and students as well as other readers all over the world are reading the blog to learn how economics relates to the events going on around us in the world. Several times per week, a post is written with the purpose of applying basic economic concepts as they affect the world and explaining them in a way within the grasp of anyone seeking a principles level understanding of economics.

Recently, new authors have joined this blog, including Steve Latter from Fairfax, Virginia, who has taught AP Economics for nine years after retiring from his career as a CPA and a chief financial officer. Steve brings much real world experience to a blog that can sometimes be a bit on the academic side. Michelle Close, a fellow SAS economics teacher, continue to write the occasional post and has committed to writing regularly next year. In addition, I have recruited a few additional econ teachers from around the world to sign on as contributing authors, and I look forward to introducing them to our readers when the new school year starts.

Welker’s Wikinomics Blog has also been invited and has since joined the Forbes.com Business and Financial Blog network, an exciting opportunity that has further increased our readership and points to the credibility of what we write about here.

Right now, I am enjoying my second day of summer vacation. Two days ago I woke up in Shanghai and headed to the airport, tonight I sleep in my mountain cabin nestled in the rugged peaks of Northern Idaho. The serenity here seems like a different universe from the chaos from Shanghai. Over the next two months I will post only occasionally to this blog, but post I will… and readers can rest assured that when a new school year begins, and I once again start teaching Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Economics (next year I’ll be teaching at Zurich International School in Switzerland), daily posts will once again return to this blog.

For now I wish to thank readers for visiting this blog, and invite you to become not just readers or visitors, but contributors as well. Comments are always welcome, and if you are an Econ teacher or professor who is interested in becoming an Econ blogger, please send me an email and I’ll see about signing you on as an author. I can be contacted at welkerswikinomics@yahoo.com

Have a great summer. Be sure to return in early August to read more great posts from myself and my fellow authors here at Welker’s Wikinomics Blog.

~Jason


About the author:  Jason Welker teaches International Baccalaureate and Advanced Placement Economics at Zurich International School in Switzerland. In addition to publishing various online resources for economics students and teachers, Jason developed the online version of the Economics course for the IB and is has authored two Economics textbooks: Pearson Baccalaureate’s Economics for the IB Diploma and REA’s AP Macroeconomics Crash Course. Jason is a native of the Pacific Northwest of the United States, and is a passionate adventurer, who considers himself a skier / mountain biker who teaches Economics in his free time. He and his wife keep a ski chalet in the mountains of Northern Idaho, which now that they live in the Swiss Alps gets far too little use. Read more posts by this author

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